Yummy!

The Mooncake festival, Lantern festival or Mid-Autumn festival, whichever you choose to call it, the festival is almost here!

We’re super blessed because halal mooncakes are common in Malaysia. You can get it in supermarkets, bakeries, hotel restaurants, even homemade ones! The choices are limitless!

If you’re new to mooncakes, then you’ve come to the right place to learn more about these delightful bite-sized delicacies synonymous with the Mid-Autumn.

Do take note that we are writing about the popular mooncake types, including non-halal types. At any rate, we encourage you to inquire from the sellers and confirm with them about the halal status of their mooncakes.

The Mooncake Types

Cantonese: Originally from Southern China, the classic Cantonese mooncake comes encased in a thin brown-coloured skin, usually filled with lotus paste with either one or two salted duck egg yokes. It comes with other fillings too, like red bean, nuts, even preserved meats. This is by far the most commonly found mooncake in Malaysia and Singapore, and yes, it happens to be our favourite mooncake type too.

Halal versions available. Popular brands include Tai Thong, Oversea and Baker’s Cottage.

Shanghai: Shanghai mooncakes are baked using short crust pastry, so you will have that buttery, crumbly texture. The filling is a rich lotus paste and a salted duck egg yolk. These mooncakes look like large scones and you can sometimes find sesame seeds being sprinkled on top.

Halal versions available. We found it on Shoppee!

Suzhou: Also known as Su-style mooncakes, the skins of these mooncakes are soft, sweet, and flaky. Suzhou mooncakes are savoury and usually stuffed with minced pork meat. The mooncakes are also stamped with edible red ink.

Teochew: Teochew mooncakes are usually filled with yam paste and a salted duck egg yolk. But it also comes in other flavours, such as red bean paste or mung bean paste. The spiral-like flaky crust wraps around the sweet filling, giving you that mesmerizing exterior.

Beijing: Beijing mooncakes are crispy on the outside and soft on the inside. It uses a lot of sesame oil.

Hokkien: Hokkien mooncakes were once known as scholar cakes as they were given to those sitting for the Imperial Examination. These white-coloured mooncakes are often filled with melon seeds, tangerine peel and winter melon. Also available are savoury options stuffed with minced meat.

Snow Skin: Originating from Hong Kong, snow skin mooncakes are not baked. The skin is made from glutinous rice flour and the texture is similar to mochi – elastic, chewy and soft. Fillings come in various kinds such as red bean paste or lotus paste. Best taken cold.

Halal versions available. Popular brands include Tai Thong, Oversea and Baker’s Cottage.

Ice Cream: Ice cream mooncakes are the modern twist to the traditional mooncake types. Ice cream mooncakes like how the name describes it are literally made of ice-cream!

Halal versions available.

Jelly: Yes! An entire mooncake made out of jelly! Or in our part of the world, agar-agar! They come in all sorts of flavours and colours, and get this, they even come with a jelly version of the salted duck egg yolk!

Halal versions available.

Chocolate: Chocolate mooncakes is another modern twist. The crust is made from chocolate and the filling can nutella, chocolate chip, oats, berries, peanut butter, the works!

Halal versions available.

Bonus!

So you think we’ve concluded our mooncake types post? Think again! But rather than make an elaborate post on them, we’ll just list them down. Be on the lookout for coffee, tiramisu and caramel macchiato type mooncakes. Great for all those coffee lovers!