Link Roundup #21: Top 3 Chinese Muslim Food Links

Hello Chinese Muslim food lovers! November came and cruised by just like that. Like is it really going to be December next week? And yes, we do know we’re a wee late with this month’s link-roundup. Let’s cut the chatter and just get on with it, shall we?

This Chinese restaurant serves fresh hand-pulled noodles featuring a secret 28-ingredient sauce

We start by sharing a piece of news all the way from Canada! Borders are reopening and people are getting in the mood to travel again. Think it’s pretty legit to share news about Chinese Muslim food businesses in other countries too. Not that we’re planning to travel to Canada anytime sooner. Any sponsors though?

Back to the article. It’s about Omni Palace, a Chinese noodle house specialising in traditional hand-pulled Lanzhou noodle dishes and other halal delicacies. The hand-pulled noodle chefs are fully skilled and have more than 20 years of stretched noodle experience.

Which brings us to a conversation I had with Karim. To make hand-pulled noodles require a certain technique and not everyone can master it. Like they even have schools teaching people how to become hand-pulled noodles masters in China! Sure, we make hand-pulled noodles at home, but compared to these masters, we are total amateurs.

5 Sajian Chinese Food Halal yang Wajib Dicoba saat Main ke Kota Malang

Let’s switch to Malay now. Ikutkan jarang sangat kami tulis dalam Bahasa Melayu. Bukan tak nak, cuma bila tulis tu mesti bunyi skema. Bunyi janggal pun ada. Jangan gelak. Apapun, kali ni kami nak kongsi berita dari Indonesia. Tak dapat pergi restoran Cina Muslim kat Kanada, mungkin boleh pergi cuba makanan Cina Muslim di Indonesia.

Berbalik pada artikel ni. Artikel ni cerita pasal kuotie, siomay, bakmie goreng, cwie mie dan nasi Hainan. Rasanya kat Malaysia pun ada jual cuma mungkin ada perbezaan dari segi rasa. Nama pun ada yang lain, sebagai contoh kalau di Malaysia siomay kami panggil siumai.

Itik panggang ala Melayu

Artikel seterusnya yang kami nak kongsi ialah dari Malaysia dan lebih tepat lagi tentang Itik Bakar Gembo di Shah Alam. Rasanya tak banyak orang Melayu buat itik panggang, jadi bagi sesiapa yang berminat bolehlah cuba beli dari kedai ni. Walaupun Itik Bakar Gembo bukan makanan Cina Muslim, kami kongsi juga kerana agak menarik bila ada orang Melayu yang buat itik panggang.

Oh, dah kongsi tiga pautan dah. Kadang-kadang terfikir juga nak tulis artikel blog mengenai makanan Cina Muslim dalam Bahasa Melayu. Insha’Allah kalau ada masa kami akan usahakan. Kalau ada jumpa mana-mana pautan yang berkaitan, harap boleh kongsi dengan kami supaya kami boleh kongsi dengan pembaca lain.

Link Roundup #20: Top 3 Chinese Muslim Food Links

Hello Chinese Muslim food lovers! With news that China would be opening its doors to foreigners soon, guess it only makes sense to feature news related to finding halal food in China. Here’s this month’s Chinese Muslim food link roundup!

Halal Restaurants

This is by far one of the most comprehensive online directory we have ever found with an extensive list of halal restaurants in China. It lists down the restaurant name, address, phone number, location, cuisine, payment options, business hours, and how to get there.

Scroll all the way below to find halal food (Muslim restaurants) in Beijing, Changsha, Chengdu, Chongqing, Dalian, Fuzhou, Guangzhou, Guilin, Guiyang, Hefei, Hohhot, Hangzhou, Haikou, Harbin, Jinan, Kashgar, Kunming, Lanzhou, Luoyang, Nanjing, Nanning, Qingdao, Shanghai, Shenzhen, Suzhou, Sanya, Shenyang, Tibet, Taiyuan, Urumqi, Wuhan, Xiamen, Xining, Xian, Yinchuan, and Zhengzhou.

Muslim Restaurants in China

Now you’ve gotten the list of restaurants to go to, how would you know which one serves the best food? In this website, you can find articles telling you the famous restaurants in Shanghai, Guangzhou, Chengdu, Shenzhen, Hangzhou, Chongqing, Xian and Suzhou.

Famous Halal Dishes in China

We can’t remember whether we’ve featured this link. But hey, there’s not harm in sharing it again. In this article, they write about the famous halal dishes in China including the ever-popular Big Plate Chicken, Lamian and Beef Noodle Soup.

Are you planning a trip to China in 2022? If the answer is a yes, then we hope this month’s link roundup would make it easier for you to find halal food to try in China. Take care and stay safe!

Link Roundup #19: Top 3 Chinese Muslim Food Links

Hello Chinese Muslim food lovers! It’s another round of Chinese Muslim food link roundup! These are some of the news that we took an interest in for the month of September.

Chinese Halal food producers eager to invest in Pakistan

The last part of the article says that; ‘Pakistani and Chinese people share some preferences in terms of food. For example, Sichuan food features spicy flavor, which exactly meets the preference of Pakistani people.’.

For the longest time ever, there is a misconception that Chinese food isn’t spicy. The statement in the article pretty much debunked that.

Culinary skills a boon for hotel exec-turned-chef

Moving closer to home, this is a heartwarming story of how a former hotel exec came up with her very own sweet and savoury homemade halal dumplings business. The dumplings here refer to the 粽子, or commonly known as chang.

We actually did an article of places in Malaysia and Singapore where you can purchase halal chang from. Here’s a quick reference for those interested to make any purchases: Where to Find Halal Chang in Malaysia, Where to Find Halal Chang in Singapore

Couple Sells Halal Kway Chap With Beef Short Ribs From Home

Here’s another feel good story, just that it’s from across the causeway. The owners of Peranakan Kway Chap are Muslims. Despite using beef, instead of pork, they managed to make the halal version of the kway chap that tastes similar to the original Peranakan Chinese dish.

That sums it up! Let us know if you come across any interesting links lately.

Link Roundup #18: Top 3 Chinese Muslim Food Links

Hello Chinese Muslim food lovers! It’s that time again for our Chinese Muslim food link roundup! Time passes far too quickly that we actually missed the link roundup for August! Here are some of the links we managed to find lately. Enjoy!

Hello Chinese Muslim food lovers! It’s that time again for our Chinese Muslim food link roundup! Time passes far too quickly that we actually missed the link roundup for August! Here are some of the links we managed to find lately. Enjoy!

Deeper trade ties with China to mark post-pandemic economic recovery

He also encouraged more Malaysian companies to invest and set up factories in the CMQIP as a window to the vast inland markets in China and suggested that both nations strengthen investment projects in palm oil, rubber, bird’s nest, durian and halal food to further solidify trade relations.

The part about solidifying trade relations through halal food intrigues us. The halal food industry needs no introduction on how huge it is on a global scale. This is certainly something to look forward too.

He lost RM100K after a robbery during MCO, bounced back with a Muslim-friendly bakkwa biz

A combination of Chinese bakkwa and Singaporean dendeng? We’ve tried both the Chinese bakkwa, and Singaporean dendeng from other sellers, but we have never tried a combination of both. So yeah, Dendeng Bakar Cik Midah did pique our curiousity. Guess we need to add this product in our foods-to-try bucket list.

Interested to get your hands on it?

Here are some of their products at their Shopee store:

Dendeng Bak Kwa HALAL (LEMBU) 200g – (Original / Spicy / Honey) Dendeng Singapore Kahwin Bak Kwa by Dendeng Cik Midah and Dendeng Temasek / Dendeng Singapore – NEW PRODUCT Dendeng Bakar 200g (1-3 Orang Makan).

Need a Shopee account? Sign-up by clicking here.

Malaysian food influencer takes to TikTok to promote racial harmony

It’s Ceddy, the CEO of Membebel! We follow him on TikTok and do enjoy his videos. It’s just one of the things we watch to humour ourselves.

That concludes our link roundup! Let us know what you think in the comments section. Have a nice day and stay safe!

Link Roundup #17: Top 3 Chinese Muslim Food Links

Top 3 Chinese Muslim Food Links

Hello Chinese Muslim food lovers! It’s time for our Chinese Muslim food link roundup! Shooooot! We just realised it’s the last day of July! There’s still time before we enter August, so let’s get on to this month’s link roundup, shall we? Today we’ll be sharing Chinese Muslim videos from Youtube. Hope you find the links as interesting as we do!

Eid al-Fitr for Muslims in Rural China in 2021|What to eat on Eid|中国云南回族开斋节2021|亲朋好友互相走访会礼游坟

Here’s a sneak peak of Eid being celebrated in rural China. The vlogger, Laotai Arui often posts videos showing the Chinese Muslim life in rural China. In this particular video, she shares the traditions of the Chinese Muslims and a quick mention about the food. She speaks in Mandarin Chinese, but that shouldn’t be a problem as you can always opt for the English subtitles.

Another recent video of hers that we felt is interesting is Lailah al-Qadr of Chinese Muslims Ramadan 2021|Guy Del Ye|Ramadan in China|2021中国穆斯林盖德尔夜|2021中国斋月

Remember to check out her Chinese Muslim food videos!

Chinese Muslims Halal Food Street In China, Ramdan In China, Abdullah In China

You don’t always find recent Chinese Muslims halal food videos on Youtube. Getting the ones from China are even harder! This video is a surprising find for us and it’s nice to see food we’re familiar with. Almost feels like we’re walking along the streets having the time of our life there.

Chinese Muslim Halal Food Street In China, Ramadan In China, MrLeeVlogs

Another surprising find! This time around, this vlogger is showing the Chinese Muslim food found at Xi’an, Shaanxi Province, China. Again, it feels nice to see food we’re familiar with. Take note that the languages used in the video are English and probably Hindi? Gosh, we’re salivating at the food.

That concludes our link roundup for this month! Found any interesting links lately? Let us know in the comment section and we’ll include it in the next link roundup. Have a good July!

Link Roundup #16: Top 3 Chinese Muslim Food Links

Hello Chinese Muslim food lovers! It’s time for our Chinese Muslim food link roundup! We noticed that we missed last month’s link roundup. Yikes! Anyway, to make up for it we will do two, yes, two link roundups for July! Here’s the first post. Hope you find the links as interesting as we do!

Banking on food deliveries to stay afloat

Eatery operators in Johor Bahru are depending on delivery service providers to help sustain their operations amid the ongoing dine-in ban during the lockdown.

In case you haven’t heard, Malaysia is still on an ongoing battle with Covid-19. As a result, businesses in general are affected to a certain degree.

For those in the restaurant business, dine-ins are still not allowed. Restaurant operators have to resort to pickups, takeaways, and food delivery companies and platforms, in order to ensure their business can continue running during this trying period. Al-Amin Xinjiang Muslim Restaurant is one of the Chinese Muslim restaurants that have adopted these approaches.

Related[MY] Al-Amin Xinjiang Muslim Restaurant, Hello Al-Amin Xinjiang Muslim Restaurant!

Halal Food Market: Global Key Players, Trends, Share, Industry Size, Growth, Opportunities, Forecast To 2027

According to Fast. MR research the report titled Global Halal Food Market provides comprehensive information regarding influential factors. Data included in the report has been curated by our team of industry experts, considering relevant information about the market. This report discusses the growth and trends of various regions and segments of the market. Information such as market drivers, restraints, opportunities, trends, gross revenue, average product/service price, and market share of major players is covered in the report.

Found this report and thought it was pretty interesting. Key questions in the report covers what challenges, trends, and barriers are likely to impact the overall development and market size of Global Halal Food Market, Halal food market company analysis, and major growth driving factors.

‘Now is the time’: China and Indonesia highlighted as major post-COVID-19 opportunity markets for halal growth

“It’s really a good time for halal food brands in China now – the government has spent a lot of money on building infrastructure like the High Speed Rail and bringing in technology and agricultural methodologies to cities like Xinjiang and Lanzhou which have many Muslim communities,” said Tng.

We knew about halal in China about a decade ago. There was an opening for someone proficient in Mandarin Chinese to work in China to educate the Chinese stakeholders about the Malaysia halal certification process.

Without a doubt, China then was already seen as a potential market for halal growth. Would that finally become a reality? Probably, considering we are seeing more and more halal products coming from China. It’d be interesting to see how things pan out.

That concludes our link roundup for this month! Found any interesting links lately? Let us know in the comment section and we’ll include it in the next link roundup. Have a good July!

Link Roundup #15: Top 3 Chinese Muslim Food Links

Hello Chinese Muslim food lovers! It’s time for our Chinese Muslim food link roundup! Hope you find the links as interesting as we do!

7 Yummy Pork-Free/Halal Dim Sum Restaurants In PJ and KL That Offer Takeaways & Deliveries

Dim sum is a staple in Malaysian cuisine, with many locals frequenting dim sum restaurants to yum cha. While dim sum is typically non-halal, these mouthwatering morsels also have pork-free and halal counterparts. Now, everyone can enjoy xiao long bao, siew mai, or yummy salted egg yolk custard buns.

In the article, they listed Zuan Yuan, Dolly Dim Sum, Jade Treasures, Mohd Chan Chinese Muslim Restaurant, Way Modern Chinois, DIN by Din Tai Fung, and Yun House. Take note that the first four restaurants are certified halal restaurants while the last three restaurants are pork-free restaurants.

Some people don’t mind eating at pork-free restaurants, but in our case, we are quite particular in this therefore we usually avoid going to such establishments.

What are pork-free restaurants? Head on over to our A Guide On How to Find a Halal Restaurant In Malaysia for a quick crash course.

As for this list, we had only been to Mohd Chan Chinese Muslim Restaurant. As far as we can remember, the dimsum there was fairly okay in taste, however the variety was quite limited. Not sure about their dimsum selection now though since we haven’t been in a Mohd Chan Chinese Muslim Restaurant in ages.

Related: [MY] Ai Ni Dim Sum, [MY] Canning Dim Sum, [MY] Canning Dim Sum Express, [MY] Dim Sum Valet, [MY] Botanica DIM SUM, [MY] Hong Kong Kitchen Penang, [MY] Restoran Budak Siew Mai By Saiful Islam

Ramadan in Hong Kong: Malaysian Muslims Share Their Experience

“Occasionally, we would go to Masjid al Amar in Wan Chai to break our fast. During Ramadan, for 30 days, they offer free meals to all Muslims to break fast,” she recalls. 

Besides Ma’s Anisha also loves the dimsum at the Islamic Canteen Center at Masjid al Amar, where she would frequent before the pandemic hit. However, Anisha and her family usually breaks fast at home.

“In the past 10 years, the availability of halal food and ingredients have increased tremendously. Now, we are able to get many Malaysian or Indonesian halal items, so we can easily cook everything at home.”

Anisha and her family usually gets their halal chicken and red meat at Tsim Sha Tsui market, and their fish and vegetables from Tseung Kwan O market or Sheung Tak market. 

On Hajar’s last trip to Hong Kong, she stayed at a hotel nearby to Masjid al Amar and had a couple of times ate dimsum at the Islamic Canteen Center. The best thing about staying around that area was how easy it was for her to find halal food. At that time, there was even a small eatery selling halal pizza.

Related: [HK] Islamic Centre Canteen

Chinese-Muslim Hawker Sells Delish Halal Char Kway Teow With Two-Hour Queue

Anis’ stall at Bukit Merah View Market & Hawker Centre is an anomaly: it’s one of the few Muslim-owned CKT stalls in Singapore catering to the Muslim community. He named his stall 786 Char Kway Teow, an Islamic symbolic number derived from Arabic numerology that means “in the name of Allah, the ever merciful, the ever compassionate”

The ever tantalising CKT. For those who are unfamiliar with it, CKT stands for Char Kway Teow 炒粿條 – a type of fried noodles dish popular in Singapore and Malaysia. Super tasty, bloody addictive, and if you have never tried it, you have got to put it in your bucket list because it’s just one of those dishes you die die must try one. /we had to unleash that inner Singlish & Manglish in us./

That concludes our link roundup for this month! Found any interesting links lately? Let us know in the comment section and we’ll include it in the next link roundup. Have a good May!

Link Roundup #14: Top 3 Chinese Muslim Food Links

Hello Chinese Muslim food lovers! It’s time for our Chinese Muslim food link roundup! Hope you find the links as interesting as we do!

Mad for mala: how Singapore’s taste for halal Chinese food has taken off

“The halal food in Singapore is very different from Xinjiang. So, I decided to set up shop and introduce Xinjiang dishes to the Muslim community here,” the 48-year-old said. The Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, the westernmost part of China that is home to largely Muslim-minority Uygurs, is known for food that is distinct from the rest of the country, with dishes such as roasted mutton and the use of thick, fragrant spices.

Tan’s restaurant, Yi Zun Noodle, specialises in beef noodles, a popular dish in Xinjiang. When she first opened in 2017, 80 per cent of her customers were Muslim, but she has since seen a greater number of non-Muslim customers.

We are familiar with Yi Zun Noodle and we went there once before the lockdown began. They serve authentic Chinese Muslim cuisine, specifically the ones from Xinjiang province. Ever since then, we noticed there has been an increase of China-style Chinese Muslim restaurants opening up in Singapore.

So why is Singapore developing a taste for halal Chinese food? It could be like how it started out in Malaysia. About 10 years ago, it’s not as easy to find China-style Chinese Muslim restaurants in Malaysia. When Mee Tarik Warisan Asli came about and opened branches in various places, that’s when we saw more of such businesses opening up.

Related: [SG] Yizun Noodle, [MY] Mee Tarik Warisan Asli

Online Hari Raya bazaars to stay for now in Singapore

Associate professor Lim Beng Soon, from the School of Humanities and Behavioural Sciences at Singapore University of Social Sciences, said virtual bazaars are the safest option given the pandemic.

He added virtual bazaars will help people stay connected with their favourite stallholders even after the bazaars end.

Assistant Professor of Arts and Culture Management at the Singapore Management University, Hoe Su Fern, said virtual modes of gathering make culture accessible to a wider population across and beyond Singapore, but argued that online bazaars can never be a replacement for physical ones.

She said: “The Hari Raya bazaar is more than just a marketplace. It is an accessible social space that brings various communities and cultures together.”

“If physical bazaars do not ultimately return and stay online, we lose an accessible and common touchpoint for shared experiences.”The best stall, in our opinion, is an unassuming unit named Kampong House Mini Wok, which serves halal-certified zi char at very wallet-friendly prices.

Another piece of news from Singapore. Apparently, the Hari Raya bazaars would be held online again this year. We found out about this earlier this year and at one point, we even thought that maybe Malaysia would follow suit. Because let’s face it, Covid-19 is still here.

Then we found out that Ramadan bazaars set to make a return in KL and other cities in Malaysia. Obviously, this piece of news is good news to us! Because even though we’re selling most of our products on Shopee Malaysia and Shopee Singapore (more on that in our next post, insha’Allah!), there’s nothing more exciting than selling our products at Ramadan and Hari Raya bazaars.

Saudee Group inks deal with Top Standard Corporation to supply frozen meat to China

The Chinese halal foods market is deemed to be one of the largest growing food industry niche, expected to reach US$17 billion or RM69.7 billion per annum in 2021, second only to Indonesia at US$18 billion or RM73.8 billion.

With the current situation of the Covid-19 pandemic having its genesis in China in 2020, there is an immediate demand for non-locally manufactured halal food and products. 

Malaysian halal certification is deemed to be at the highest international standard, and the penetration to the Chinese muslim market is seen to be a natural expansion progression for Saudee Group to embark into.

Finding halal food in China can be difficult! So this is definitely something to look forward to. Hopefully, it’d be easier for the Muslims, both the ones staying in China and the ones travelling to China, to find proper halal food.

Alternatively, you could also read our post ‘A Guide To Finding Halal Food In China‘ for some ideas.

That concludes our link roundup for this month! Found any interesting links? Let us know in the comment section and we’ll include it in the next link roundup. Have a good April!

Link Roundup #13: Top 3 Chinese Muslim Food Links

Hello Chinese Muslim food lovers! It’s time for our Chinese Muslim food link roundup! Hope you find the links as interesting as we do!

New pride of royal town

SELANGOR’S first Chinese Muslim mosque with a three-storey pagoda that will serve as the minaret, is to be built in Klang.

The mosque, which will have elaborate Chinese architectural features, is inspired by the Great Mosque of Xi’an in China.

Xian is the capital of Shaanxi province.

The mosque will boast ornate carvings and will use less bricks in its construction as more wood is preferred for the walls, pillars and beams in its surrounding complex.

Nothing to do with Chinese Muslim food, though we are hoping there’s the possibility that Chinese Muslim food businesses would be given the opportunity to run their business near to this Chinese Muslim mosque. The reason is that usually whenever we go overseas, the easiest way to find halal food is to find the nearest mosque.

Since the mosque is fundamentally based on Chinese Muslim architecture and culture, we reckon it’s a good idea to have a handful of Chinese Muslim located within the vicinity. Muslims from other races and even visitors from other religions could probably learn a little more about the Chinese Muslim culture, and we know how food can be a great ice-breaker .

Taman Jurong Halal Zi Char Stall Has $8 Sliced Fish Steamboat & Har Cheong Gai

The best stall, in our opinion, is an unassuming unit named Kampong House Mini Wok, which serves halal-certified zi char at very wallet-friendly prices.

It has rice sets like Salted Egg Chicken ($5.50), Assam Batang Fish ($5.50) and Black Pepper Beef ($6.50) as well as San Lor Hor Fun ($5) and Seafood Fried Rice ($5.50). You can also get sides like Prawn Omelette ($6) and Petai with Sotong ($12).

It has probably been about 2 years since we went to Singapore. One thing’s for sure, the Chinese Muslim food business scene there is booming! We have a couple of friends who are running their own China-style Chinese Muslim food businesses there and they’re doing quite well. Related: [SG] Yizun Noodle, [SG] JinshangYipin Hot Pot By Asian Spyces

Having said that, it has been far too long since we had any halal zi char. Once we’re able to travel again, we’d love to visit Kampong House Mini Wok and try out their food.

Not visiting this Chinese New Year in Singapore? These restaurants and bars are staying open throughout

Hankering for prawn mee? Halal hawker chain Deanna’s Kitchen is keeping their Jurong East and Chai Chee outlets open throughout Chinese New Year, so you can get your fix of Prawn Mee ($4++) starring a slurpworthy prawn and anchovy broth. To double your laughter for the new year, chow down on the seriously umami Big Prawns & Clam Mee ($9).

Deanna’s Kitchen has branches in Jurong East, Toa Payoh, and Chai Chee. The Jurong East and Chai Chee outlets will be open throughout Chinese New Year from 10am–9pm, while the Toa Payoh outlet will be closed from 11 to 14 February 2021.

Okay, so in the entire article there’s only one halal Chinese Muslim food business. All the more reason to feature it in our link roundup! We’ve heard so much about Deanna’s Kitchen from friends in Singapore. Haven’t gotten the chance to try it though. For those who’ve tasted it, do share with us what you think about their prawn mee.

That concludes our link roundup for this month! Found any interesting links? Let us know in the comment section and we’ll include it in the next link roundup. Have a good March!